Great Movie Scenes – Part 1

Sounding the spoiler claxon nice and early here.

‘Interstellar’ (2014) – Docking

Christopher Nolan’s space epic is a favourite of mine. Arriving after his Batman Trilogy and before recent critical hit Dunkirk, Interstellar‘s reception was a little more lukewarm. Its run time clocks in around 3 hours, dives into black holes and time dilation and ties it all together with love and family. There are several spectacular scenes (Miller’s Planet and just about any involving the Black Hole named Gargantua) but the most unforgettable is the Docking sequence.

Starting with the explosion in space without sound is haunting, it puts us in a moment – following from Dr Mann’s last piece of dialogue – and a moment is all Cooper needs to consider his options. The visual of the Endurance spinning, the ticking clock sound underpinning the score, debris scattering above the Ice Planet below, combined with the Organ striking up and thrusting us into the do or die attempt at docking is a perfect build of tension. The track features a grander, stretched out version of the motif which runs throughout Hans Zimmer’s score. It helps emphasise the strain on Cooper and the struggle as he attempts to dock the ship –  failure to do so will see them stranded or sucked back onto the Ice Planet below; their mission and mankind, in ruin.

’28 Days Later’ (2002) – Opening

I’m still holding out hope for the final movie in the 28 Days/Weeks series. It’s a forlorn and fruitless hope, I’ll only be disappointed as it seems the chances are almost as remote as surviving in the post-apocalyptic world built by Danny Boyle and Alex Garland. The film rejuvenated the Zombie genre, despite technically not being a zombie film. It’s such a bleak setting, but that only serves to make the few glimmers of hope so beautiful.

YouTube doesn’t have the full opening scene, but it gives a flavor of it. Sadly it skips the part where Cillian Murphy wakes up ‘bawz oot’, but that’s not hard to find. The empty London streets, usually smothered in people, houses only scattered souvenirs. The slow build of the music helps to elevate the unease and yet despite this, it’s an oddly personal scene. We’re questioning everything just as Jim is, where the fuck is everyone? What happened? His simple screams of ‘Hello’ which echo, unanswered, are haunting. I’m sure on reflection I can think of a better opening to a film, but as I write this I think this is probably my favourite. Also, as YouTube neglected to give us the whole opening here is another favourite: “World’s worst place to get a flat”

‘Jaws’ (1975) – Indianapolis Speech

Nothing really needs to be said about how iconic Jaws is so let’s just get into the scene:

The trio of Brody, Hooper and Flint enjoy a fractious relationship in the early stages of their journey. This scene is an absolute masterclass. The visual build up as Flint and Hooper compare injuries which grow as they go on competing gives us a false sense of camaraderie before the tension sets in and Flint recounts the aftermath of the sinking of the Indianapolis in World War II. The jovial atmosphere of the scene evaporates. We’re granted an insight into the tragic backstory of Flint, who initially comes off a unhinged, and we share the shock, discomfort and yet an element of sympathy and understanding which Brody and Hooper feel. Flint suddenly seems vulnerable, more human and relatable. It’s a wonderful way of humanising a character who initially appears as a bit of a lunatic and of course foreshadows what’s to come.

‘Baby Driver’ (2017) – Coffee Run

I’ve got some serious love for Baby Driver and I’m a big fan of Edgar Wright – though I’m not a huge fan of his movies. I went into Baby Driver not knowing what to expect, but not really expecting much either. What I got was a captivating experience, one of the most stylised movies I’ve ever seen which deserves all the praise it got and more for some incredible sound editing. This isn’t necessarily my favourite scene in the movie but it demonstrates everything the movie does well.

Each scene in the film features a track and it’s designed to match it. Actions meet the rhythm and beat in the soundtrack. It’s more apparent in the action orientated scenes but the coffee run scene manages to capture the subtlety and the more obvious moments of cohesion. The graffiti matches the song lyrics perfectly, see 0:40-0:45 “whole lotta” is graffitied behind dancers and “soul” appears on the lamp post Baby shimmies around. Baby slides to the left as a passerby barges past, just as the lyric commands, quickly transitioning into him playing the trumpet positioned in a shop window – it’s film making at the highest level. Managing to capture such synchronicity with subtle moments in a near 3 minute tracking shot so effectively is such a great technical achievement, it adds an extra layer to a film which already oozes style.

I’ll leave it here for just now but I’ll try and fill Part 2 with less tension orientated scenes. (and I’ll probably fail at doing so)

Okay… let’s leave it with some fun to counter the serious scenes:

 

Spider-Man: Homecoming – Spoiler free review

Spider-Man slings himself back onto the big screen with an infectious style and excitability. Tom Holland is the perfect fit for both the role of Spider-Man and Peter Parker. 

The movie never feels like it’s going over old, well trodden ground which is testament to the strong writing and fluid plot. 

The opening scenes add a sympathetic element to the antagonist, Vulture, and believable motivations. As the plot unfolds the stakes heighten between him and Spider-Man in interesting and surprising ways. Although, his somewhat flippant descent into being comfortable with killing felt slightly jarring.

Peter Parker’s sidekick Ned provides an extra comedic layer to the film. Their friendship helps to keep things moving during the high school scenes which never descend into the realms of boring. However many scenes are stolen by Zendaya’s character Michelle, who is excellent throughout.

The action scenes are well choreographed, although the climactic battle does get a little hard to follow at certain points. Michael Giaccino provides his usual blend of subtle and bombastic for the movie’s soundtrack.

The romantic element with Liz didn’t quite stick, feeling somewhat contrived from the outset. However, it did manage to add an extra dynamic to the climax.

Spider-Man: Homecoming is an effective reintroduction to a character whom we are well acquainted with both cinematically and in his comic book origins. The movie does an excellent job of reinvigorating Spider-Man and breathing new life into the MCU.

Arrival – Review

Dennis Villeneuve’s Arrival is an engrossing Sci-Fi experience which substitutes weapons for ingenuity.  The film is a refreshing take on the first contact trope, as Dr. Louise Banks (Amy Adams) attempts to uncover the alien visitors’ intentions through using her skills in linguistics. The result is an engaging experience which conjures drama and tension without violence, relying upon a captivating performance by Adams and a story which is grand in scope but manages to remain personal.

Little time is wasted setting up the aliens’ arrival. The visitors, dubbed Heptapods, position twelve ships at seemingly random locations throughout the world. The affected countries establish communications with one another in an attempt to ascertain what the Heptapods’ intentions are. Colonel Weber (Forest Whitaker) is sent to recruit Dr. Banks after some previous successful linguistic work with the army. Not every country agrees on a particular approach and China’s preference for aggression establishes a simmering threat to Dr. Banks’ peaceful method.

Much of the emotional resonance in the movie is attributed to a tragedy in Dr. Banks’ personal life. This tragedy, and the scenes depicting Banks’ personal life, creates an additional layer of tension which compliments the pressure situation of trying to communicate with the Heptapods. Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner), an astrophysicist, is an effective foil for Banks and the two build their own relationship as they attempt to construct one with the Heptapods.

Banks’ efforts to communicate with the Heptapods are key to getting an answer to the question: ‘What is your purpose on earth?’ She establishes visual aids as the most effective method of creating an understanding with the visitors. It’s fascinating to witness a rapport develop as they teach constructs of our language that we take for granted.  Each breakthrough that Banks makes is met with further pressure from Colonel Weber as the twelve countries stop cooperating with one another.

It becomes frustrating that Weber often doubts Dr. Banks, despite the obvious duress he is under, as this slips into cliché territory. Whittaker’s accent becomes as inconsistent as his character’s motivations. One particular plot point is too quickly glossed over whilst another borders on descent into the realm of silly. However, Adams’ engaging performance keeps the audience grounded as the film reaches its climax.

Fans of recent Sci-Fi hits such as Interstellar and Midnight Special should enjoy Villneuve’s Arrival, as it poses thought provoking questions whilst managing not to lose sight of the human aspect. This is owed to Adams’ excellent performance. The movie’s more ambitious elements remain grounded through her ability to engage the audience as the Heptapods’ true intentions are deciphered. Indeed the prevailing message, that humanity must work together, has never been more relevant.

 

Don’t Breathe – Review

Don’t Breathe focuses on three young thieves planning to rob a blind army veteran’s home. The movie lures audiences in with this premise and what we uncover is something far more sinister. Fede Alvarez’s latest horror demonstrates a masterful use of silence to develop tension whilst toying with the audience as we question just who it is we are rooting for.

Don’t Breathe opens with a scene which casts doubt on how innocent The Blind Man is, before spending a few short scenes establishing the daily lives and struggles of the ‘protagonists’ in attempt to lend sympathy. It’s fairly routine stuff; Rocky (Jane Levy) plans to escape Detroit with her young sister, saving her from a dead end life. Money (Daniel Zovatto) is in a loose relationship with Rocky and is responsible for trading the group’s bounty for cash. Alex (Dylan Minnette) is the voice of reason – initially unwilling to break into The Blind Man’s home. It’s also clear he has romantic feelings for Rocky. Their target, The Blind Man, received a huge cash settlement when his daughter was killed in a road accident.

The Blind Man’s neighbourhood is desolate, each house abandoned, only his home remains reflecting the only choice these characters feel they have. The setting captures the dead end life the thieves are facing. Once inside the home, they quickly lose control of the situation. The Blind Man is more than capable of defending his home and they become trapped in a situation which threatens to cost them their lives. The vacant neighbourhood that seemed to grant them freedom instead traps them, as their screams fall upon deaf ears.

The camera work is particularly effective in capturing hints that help The Blind Man navigate his home. One terrifying scene in the basement has Rocky and Alex attempt to flee The Blind Man in the pitch black. Alvarez expertly demonstrates the advantage The Blind Man has as he navigates using his other senses. He holds his arm aloft, touching a segment of lowered ceiling and feels items on shelves which help to place himself.

Alvarez grips the audience through his use of silence. The biggest advantage the thieves have is to avoid making any noise. The suspense creeps up on the audience and snares us, just as the thieves strive to contain every breath and squirm across floorboards as they attempt to escape.

The initial plot is formulaic enough, though this doesn’t serve to spoil the enjoyment. That the Blind Man harbours a secret is somewhat predictable. However, by twisting the formulaic premise the movie creates an extra dimension. It scratches at some of our most primal fears, adding another horrifying layer to the movie.

Don’t Breathe is an engrossing horror which exploits silence and clever camera work to deliver a thrilling, twisted experience that exceeds its initially formulaic premise.